ca. 1864, [Portrait of Lt. General Ulysses S. Grant], Matthew Brady
via the Cartographic Associates

ca. 1864, [Portrait of Lt. General Ulysses S. Grant], Matthew Brady

via the Cartographic Associates

ca. 1864, [half stereocard of a despondent looking General Ulysses S. Grant]
via Ebay

ca. 1864, [half stereocard of a despondent looking General Ulysses S. Grant]

via Ebay

ca. 1870-80, [Portrait of Ulysses S. Grant], Matthew Brady
via the Library of Congress, Brady-Handy Photograph Collection

ca. 1870-80, [Portrait of Ulysses S. Grant], Matthew Brady

via the Library of Congress, Brady-Handy Photograph Collection


“There are many men who would have done better than I did under the   circumstances in which I found myself. If I had never held command; if I   had fallen, there were 10,000 behind who would have followed the  contest  to the end and never surrendered the Union.” 

-Ulysses S. Grant in his memoirs

There are many men who would have done better than I did under the circumstances in which I found myself. If I had never held command; if I had fallen, there were 10,000 behind who would have followed the contest to the end and never surrendered the Union.”

-Ulysses S. Grant in his memoirs

ca. 1860-70, [Portrait of U.S. Grant]
via the Library of Congress, Civil War Glass Negatives and Related Prints
ca. 1885, “U.S. Grant writing his memoirs at Mount McGregor, June 27th”, Howe
via the Library of Congress

ca. 1885, “U.S. Grant writing his memoirs at Mount McGregor, June 27th”, Howe

via the Library of Congress

ca. 1865, signed carte de visite of Ulysses S. Grant
via Heritage Auction Galleries

ca. 1865, signed carte de visite of Ulysses S. Grant

via Heritage Auction Galleries

On April 14, 1865, Ulysses S. Grant and his wife were invited by President Lincoln to attend a Ford’s Theater production. Grant regretfully declined that fateful night and instead took his wife to Philadelphia. 
 Lincoln had been Grant’s greatest champion, friend, and military  adviser. Lincoln had said after Shiloh, “I can’t spare this man. He  fights.”

On April 14, 1865, Ulysses S. Grant and his wife were invited by President Lincoln to attend a Ford’s Theater production. Grant regretfully declined that fateful night and instead took his wife to Philadelphia.

Lincoln had been Grant’s greatest champion, friend, and military adviser. Lincoln had said after Shiloh, “I can’t spare this man. He fights.”

"Until the handkerchief of history covers us with its Times New Roman black and white post script..."

This blog is a collection of vernacular photography and ephemera focused mainly within the curious and often misunderstood realm of 19th century America. I have a soft spot for all things silly, antiquated, macabre, and grotesque. The content is from a variety of collections; public, academic, and private. In addition, there's an occasional emphasis on Ulysses S Grant and the Civil War, as well.

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